Thanksgiving Baskets 2017

 

Happy Thanksgiving from The Hunger Coalition! On Monday, November 20 (and the days leading up to), local businesses, organizations, individuals, and families came together for the greater good: to ensure every family in need had a warm, full holiday meal to share with their loved ones. Full story here: http://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/features/volunteers-put-the-giving-in-holiday/article_dc838fce-cf06-11e7-842c-9bcf5cd057d3.html

Locals donated food, funds, and their time to make this important day possible. We are thankful for everyone involved – special thanks to:

+ The Sage School for coordinating our Thanksgiving food drive – collecting and delivering all the food

+ Thanksgiving food drive contributors: Sun Valley Company, POWER Engineers, Rocky Mountain Hardware, Sothebys Real Estate
+ 450 Homemade pies were made by Pioneer Montessori School, Sage School led by Starr Weekes, and Syringa Mountain School 
+ Albertsons who donated 160 Thanksgiving meals with funds raised by the community
+ Higher Ground whose entire staff volunteered and delivered 390 turkeys
BCRD who let us use the gym 
+ Community Library and Hailey Public Library who handed out free books to all of the children
+ Volunteer team leaders – Laurie and Matt Christian, Tony Knapp, and Jenna Resko and the 75 volunteers who made sure the entire effort ran smooth
+ Sage School students also made 150 cards, a Sage School mother made 80 more herself, the families of Sherri Ditch and Carey Thaxton also made cards  
+ Teresa Gregory and Juan Servin were especially helpful at the Community Campus

and thanks to everyone who so generously donated the funds to provide these holiday meals to our neighbors in need!

Farm Appreciation Party 2017

This year’s Farm Appreciation Party was one to remember thanks to our extraordinarily awesome community. First and foremost, thanks to everyone who came out to enjoy Bloom Community Farm and made the evening truly special, thanks to our generous sponsor, D. L. Evans Bank, to Hal Jardine & Sun Valley Resort for the delicious appetizers, Bigwood Bread Bakery and Cafe for everyone’s favorite bread, thanks to S&C Wines and Sawtooth Brewery for keeping our glasses full, to Andrew Sheppard Music for laying it down, to Charlotta Harris, Judy Cahill, and Tyler Michael Hendricks for documenting the evening (@Charlotta’s beautiful photos here), to Mike McKenna for hauling and tapping the keg, then to Lance Thompson for troubleshooting, to our amazing board (McNair Livingston Bailey, @Deb Robertson, Laurie Strand, Craig Eastop, @Todd Stewart, Elizabeth Huish, @Linda Edwards) who stepped in and welcomed guests, tended bar, managed parking, helped setup and break down, to the local companies who donated raffle prizes as an extra special thank you for our wonderful volunteers, and to our staff who sure can throw a mean party: Noel Jensen, Megan Schooley, Krista Felton, Lynea Petty, Naomi Spence, Brooke Pace McKenna, Jeanne Ernst Liston, Sierra Schuckert, Sharon Dohse, @Abbie Mallory, and the ever-bloomin’ Bloom Youth Project interns!

 

September 2017 Newsletter

While many hands make light work, many hearts make the difference. It takes a lot of heart to redefine food security in Blaine County, but fortunately, this community’s no slouch.

That’s why tomorrow, with wonder and awe, we honor the many people who address the challenges of hunger in Blaine County at our Farm Appreciation Party. 

Your support has made a tremendous difference this year in the lives of our neighbors. 

We invite you, the strong-hearted, community-minded, stop-at-nothing-to-do-the-right-thing people of Blaine County to celebrate your accomplishments. The party is tomorrow evening, Wednesday, September 13 at Bloom Community Farm.

Come on down and enjoy the music of Andrew Sheppard, light, harvest-fresh fare, drinks, and farm tours led by Bloom Youth Project interns, whose personal growth is soaring alongside the green rows of the farm.

Special thanks to D.L. Evans Bank for making the evening possible. Hope to see you there!

Read the full September 2017 newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

With Gratitude,
Jeanne Liston, executive director


FARM APPRECIATION PARTY

When: 
Wednesday, September 13 | 5:30-7:00 p.m.

Where:
Bloom Community Farm
South end of Quigley Farm, Hailey entry/access via Fox Acres Road, just past high school football field

Made possible by D.L. Evans Bank

Please email or call with questions to info@thehungercoalition.org or 208-788-0121


FROM THE FIELD

photo by Karen Bossick 

The high yielding, feel good acre of Bloom Community Farm has been making headlines lately – particularly, our Volunteer for Veggies program.

In case you missed them, here are three great articles by our friends at Idaho Mountain Express, Eye on Sun Valley, and The Weekly Sun.

A farm is in full ‘Bloom’ near Hailey – by Mark Dee, Idaho Mountain Express

There’s more blooming at Bloom Community Farm than meets the eye – Karen Bossick, Eye on Sun Valley

Volunteer for Veggies (page 6) by Dana DuGan, The Weekly Sun

Volunteer for Veggies participants are partly to thank for this season’s healthy harvest, totaling over 4,300 lbs between Bloom Community Farm and The Hope Garden. Thanks to everyone who’s made these impressive yields possible!

Please note, there are new Volunteer for Veggies hours for September and October – Click here for current volunteer hours

Bloom Youth Project Iron Chef Competition

Last month, Bloom Youth Project interns and Sharon Dohse, client resource and education supervisor, devised a friendly Iron Chef-style competition to demonstrate their farm-fresh cooking and teamwork skills. What resulted was something to behold. They made roasted root vegetable pot stickers, vegetable curry, chili-sweet corn ice cream (winner – most creative), salad with corn, tomato, and herbs, rice pudding with berries and much, much, more.

Thank you Sun Valley Company Chefs, Hal Jardine and Steve Van Zelfden for mentoring the chefs-in-training, and judges Sarah Barnett Seppa, Wendy Little, and Sierra Schuckert and the one and only Sharon Dohse for making it all happen.

Bloom Youth Project is funded in part by the Wood River Women’s Foundation.

Please enjoy the beautiful presentation and hard work of the interns…..

Photos by Shanti LaRue

February 2017 Newsletter


jeanne_liston_fall3_2016Big goals are our North Star.
 
Goals help turn our wildest dreams into action to ensure we have a lasting impact on our community.

Your generosity gives life to big goals. 

This time last year, Bloom was a wild dream. With heart, grit, long hours, and your support, we harvested nearly 1,000 lbs of food from Bloom Community Farm and served 144 children lunch from the Bloom Trailer, all through a program that was just a question mark on our chalkboard less than a year ago.

You made this possible.

Setting goals for 2017 fed the fire in our hearts. Building on the momentum from last year, we are poised to help more people than ever, in brand new ways. If the response from our Empty Bowls event or Naomi Spence’s Women’s March speech is any indication, 2017 is going to be productive. Thank you to everyone who has already rallied for food security.

We’re excited to share our goals with you so we can continue on this path together, helping local families and improving our community.

Join us to make sure no one in Blaine County goes hungry

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, Executive Director

Read the full February newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.


AMBITION TO FRUITION 

Presenting The Hunger Coalition’s 2017 goals: 

1. To continue to answer the need by providing food assistance for 17% of Blaine County or 3,500 people.

2. Engage community members to provide 8,000 volunteer hours, keeping our organization efficient.

3. Work with partner advocates involved in our Snack Pack Program to provide 6,250 snack packs to 200 students.

4. Increase healthy summer meals served to a total of 275 children through our expanded Summer Food Program: Bloom, Lunch in the Park, and Summer Camps

5. Ensure 100% of mothers who reach out to us have access to vital nutrition for their infants during the first year of their lives through our Infant Formula Program.

6. Provide two opportunities per week at Bloom Community Farm and The Hope Garden for Volunteer for Veggies during the growing season.

7. Run an 18-week Mobile Market for low income seniors and other vulnerable populations, offering food and nutrition education for a minimum of 25 people weekly.

8. Provide a platform for 10 partner groups at Bloom Community Farm and three groups at The Hope Garden to achieve mutual community wellness goals.

9. Engage up to 75 youth and adults in comprehensive Nutrition Education that will improve long-term health through nutritious, affordable eating.

10. Rescue a minimum of 85,000 pounds of food through our Food Rescue Program to feed the hungry, reduce food waste, and maximize community resources.


RAISING THE BAR

The conversation around living wage is one that often gets lost in variables. Since Naomi Spence’s stirring speech at the Women’s March in Ketchum, we’ve been asked what exactly constitutes a livable wage in Blaine County? To help bring clarity to the conversation, Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT) developed a resource that calculates living wage across the country. The calculator lists typical expenses, the living wage, and poverty wages for the selected location. Click here to calculate the living wage for Blaine County.

Over 3,500 people in our community rely on food assistance, most of whom work, but make less than the livable wage in Blaine County. While we are committed to providing food for these families, another part of our mission is to address the underlying causes of hunger. We move to open the dialogue around the local living wage so together, we can better solve the problems that plague our neighbors.

Contact Naomi at 788-0121 or nspence@thehungercoalition.org to join the conversation.

Empty Bowls: January 15

emptybowls_2017_poster-iiiiWe hope to see you at the 7th annual Empty Bowls event to enjoy great food and great art on behalf of The Hunger Coalition. Purchase a handmade ceramic bowl for $20 and fill it with soup, chili, salad, bread, and dessert made by local chefs! All proceeds benefit The Hunger Coalition.

This signature Wood River event is made possible by the collaboration of Boulder Mountain Clayworks, Presbyterian Church of the Big Wood, and The Hunger Coalition.

Empty Bowls is held at the Presbyterian Church of the Big Wood’s cafeteria and features gourmet soups, crisp salads, hearty chili, fresh breads and delicious desserts from local restaurants and caterers including: Big Belly Deli, Bigwood Bread, CK’s Real Food, Cornerstone, Esta, The Grill at Knob Hill, Globus, The Haven, Ketchum Grill, Mahoney’s, Perry’s, Rasberrys, Starbucks, Sun Valley Company, Vingtage and many more.

Can’t go? Donate $20 here to support those in need and write Empty Bowls in the notes section.

Thank you Boulder Mountain Clayworks & Presbyterian Church of the Big Wood for your tremendous support!

The Many Courses of Cooking Matters

In collaboration with the Idaho Foodbank and made possible by the generosity of St. Luke’s Wood River Foundation, The Hunger Coalition partnered with Silver Creek High School to take students on a multi-course adventure in cooking. The Cooking Matters class began with education in nutrition and hands-on cooking skills, involved a field trip to Atkinson’s Market where students took on the $10 challenge, and culminated in a cooking competition, complete with local chefs at the judges table. Impressed by the students’ talent, Chef Kate Metzger from Il Naso graciously invited the class into her kitchen so they could experience a professional kitchen firsthand.

The Hunger Coalition’s educator in residence, Sharon Dohse expressed how valuable Cooking Matters was to the students. She said, “The most amazing part of this class is the focus, intention, and collaboration that happens among the students. This year I witnessed problem-solving and self-evaluation on a higher level. Our judges panel asked hard questions, gave in-depth feedback, and shared more information about their personal rise to being a head chef.”

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