October 2017 Newsletter

There’s an uncomfortable fact of life in our community: slack season is hurting our working class. After a summer of empowering food support programs and shared abundance, the harsh reality of slack season has surfaced in our food bank lines.

From the beginning of September to the end, we saw a 48% increase in people needing food. These are local construction workers, landscapers, child care workers, and hospitality professionals – people you rely on who also need your support this season. As we enter a challenging time of year for our neighbors, the generosity and hope of those committed to the cause help keep us moving forward.

There are several opportunities to help. Your gifts are invested in food and support programs to provide immediate relief for struggling families. Volunteers walk people through our food bank lines, distribute holiday meals, rescue food from local grocers, and bring meals and snacks to hungry children. Local groups and organizations facilitate food drives to help fill our shelves. You too can advance this humbling community effort to ensure no one in Blaine County goes hungry.

Thank you to everyone who continues to help support this critical mission. 

Read the full October 2017 Newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, executive director


FROM THE FIELD


photo by Judy Cahill

As the days cool down, we reflect on an amazing growing season. This season, our community harvested over 7,500 pounds of fresh fruits and veggies (and counting!) from Bloom Community Farm and The Hope Garden. To think, this time last year, we were excited to report a respectable 1,300 pounds of harvest.

Thanks to everyone who helped make this remarkable growth possible. To the many volunteers, including 224 Volunteer for Veggies participants, partners, donors, and staff who joined together around good food and, as a result, strengthened our community. 

BLOOM YOUTH PROJECT

It seems like only yesterday Bloom Youth Project interns first set foot on Bloom Community Farm, a little green, not knowing exactly what to expect. Six months later, they’ve far exceeded our expectations.

Megan Schooley, Bloom Youth program director said, “The interns have really impressed us. There’s so much to be proud of. They’ve all come forward with a real skill set, compassion, leadership and professionalism.”

As their internship winds to a close, Bloom Youth have been drafting future dreams and considering their next direction. When asked what he would want to learn from a future career, potentially in teaching, Matt said, “Anything and everything! I love learning and am constantly pushing myself to experience and educate – because even teaching is a learning experience.”

photos by Judy Cahill & Charlotta Harris