October 2017 Newsletter

There’s an uncomfortable fact of life in our community: slack season is hurting our working class. After a summer of empowering food support programs and shared abundance, the harsh reality of slack season has surfaced in our food bank lines.

From the beginning of September to the end, we saw a 48% increase in people needing food. These are local construction workers, landscapers, child care workers, and hospitality professionals – people you rely on who also need your support this season. As we enter a challenging time of year for our neighbors, the generosity and hope of those committed to the cause help keep us moving forward.

There are several opportunities to help. Your gifts are invested in food and support programs to provide immediate relief for struggling families. Volunteers walk people through our food bank lines, distribute holiday meals, rescue food from local grocers, and bring meals and snacks to hungry children. Local groups and organizations facilitate food drives to help fill our shelves. You too can advance this humbling community effort to ensure no one in Blaine County goes hungry.

Thank you to everyone who continues to help support this critical mission. 

Read the full October 2017 Newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, executive director


FROM THE FIELD


photo by Judy Cahill

As the days cool down, we reflect on an amazing growing season. This season, our community harvested over 7,500 pounds of fresh fruits and veggies (and counting!) from Bloom Community Farm and The Hope Garden. To think, this time last year, we were excited to report a respectable 1,300 pounds of harvest.

Thanks to everyone who helped make this remarkable growth possible. To the many volunteers, including 224 Volunteer for Veggies participants, partners, donors, and staff who joined together around good food and, as a result, strengthened our community. 

BLOOM YOUTH PROJECT

It seems like only yesterday Bloom Youth Project interns first set foot on Bloom Community Farm, a little green, not knowing exactly what to expect. Six months later, they’ve far exceeded our expectations.

Megan Schooley, Bloom Youth program director said, “The interns have really impressed us. There’s so much to be proud of. They’ve all come forward with a real skill set, compassion, leadership and professionalism.”

As their internship winds to a close, Bloom Youth have been drafting future dreams and considering their next direction. When asked what he would want to learn from a future career, potentially in teaching, Matt said, “Anything and everything! I love learning and am constantly pushing myself to experience and educate – because even teaching is a learning experience.”

photos by Judy Cahill & Charlotta Harris

September 2017 Newsletter

While many hands make light work, many hearts make the difference. It takes a lot of heart to redefine food security in Blaine County, but fortunately, this community’s no slouch.

That’s why tomorrow, with wonder and awe, we honor the many people who address the challenges of hunger in Blaine County at our Farm Appreciation Party. 

Your support has made a tremendous difference this year in the lives of our neighbors. 

We invite you, the strong-hearted, community-minded, stop-at-nothing-to-do-the-right-thing people of Blaine County to celebrate your accomplishments. The party is tomorrow evening, Wednesday, September 13 at Bloom Community Farm.

Come on down and enjoy the music of Andrew Sheppard, light, harvest-fresh fare, drinks, and farm tours led by Bloom Youth Project interns, whose personal growth is soaring alongside the green rows of the farm.

Special thanks to D.L. Evans Bank for making the evening possible. Hope to see you there!

Read the full September 2017 newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

With Gratitude,
Jeanne Liston, executive director


FARM APPRECIATION PARTY

When: 
Wednesday, September 13 | 5:30-7:00 p.m.

Where:
Bloom Community Farm
South end of Quigley Farm, Hailey entry/access via Fox Acres Road, just past high school football field

Made possible by D.L. Evans Bank

Please email or call with questions to info@thehungercoalition.org or 208-788-0121


FROM THE FIELD

photo by Karen Bossick 

The high yielding, feel good acre of Bloom Community Farm has been making headlines lately – particularly, our Volunteer for Veggies program.

In case you missed them, here are three great articles by our friends at Idaho Mountain Express, Eye on Sun Valley, and The Weekly Sun.

A farm is in full ‘Bloom’ near Hailey – by Mark Dee, Idaho Mountain Express

There’s more blooming at Bloom Community Farm than meets the eye – Karen Bossick, Eye on Sun Valley

Volunteer for Veggies (page 6) by Dana DuGan, The Weekly Sun

Volunteer for Veggies participants are partly to thank for this season’s healthy harvest, totaling over 4,300 lbs between Bloom Community Farm and The Hope Garden. Thanks to everyone who’s made these impressive yields possible!

Please note, there are new Volunteer for Veggies hours for September and October – Click here for current volunteer hours

August 2017 Newsletter

jeanne_liston_fall3_2016Change looks different from person to person. We all share the capacity to hurt, hope, and heal, but in very different ways, influenced by our vastly different experiences.  

Your support of The Hunger Coalition has influenced change in countless ways. Here are five powerful examples of how your generosity is positively impacting lives this summer.

1. Bloom Youth Project intern, Savannah, has gone from the self-proclaimed worst kid in the world, to a confident, ambitious teen, working toward a bright future as a preschool teacher

2. Volunteer for Veggies participant, Cindy, used to rely on canned corn and potatoes as the few vegetables she could afford to feed her family. Now their dinner plates are filled with a bright palate of produce she harvested from Bloom Community Farm.

3. Gabriel was a standoffish eight year old who didn’t trust new adults. In time, he warmed up to the staff at Bloom Truck, and now enjoys healthy lunches and reading each week.   

4. Without transportation of his own, local senior, Richard, struggled to get to the grocery store, much less afford produce when there. The Bloom Youth run Mobile Market brings deeply discounted veggies right to his neighborhood so he can regularly enjoy his favorites: radishes and Chinese cabbage.

5. Bloom Youth Project Intern, Maryanna feels stronger and healthier since she started her internship. She now shares what she’s learned about gardening, cooking, and budgeting with her family so they can grow together.

Thank you for all you do to support people in our community like Savannah, Cindy, Gabriel, Richard, and Maryanna. Please join us to celebrate all you’ve helped accomplish at our farm appreciation party Wednesday, September 13!  

Read the full July 2017 Newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, executive director


FARM APPRECIATION PARTY

Community support made a colossal difference this year for Bloom and The Hunger Coalition. Join us to celebrate our collective accomplishments and honor the progress of Bloom Youth Project Interns, whose personal growth is soaring alongside the green rows of Bloom Community Farm. Everyone’s invited! Enjoy harvest-fresh bites! Drinks! Farm tours! Music!

When:
Wednesday, September 13 | 5:30-7:00 p.m.

Where:
Bloom Community Farm
South end of Quigley Farm, Hailey entry/access via Fox Acres Road, just past high school football field

Please RSVP by Tuesday, September 5 to info@thehungercoalition.org or 208-788-0121. Hope to see you there!


FROM THE FIELD


photo by Charlotta Harris

We’ve harvested a ton of food this summer – literally over 2,000 lbs, or one ton, of fresh fruits and veggies have filled the shelves of our food bank, been sold at deeply discounted rates to vulnerable neighbors through our mobile market, enhanced kids’ summer meals, and gone home with Volunteer for Veggies participants. Between our staff farm team, Bloom Youth, community partners, and over 125 local volunteers, this mammoth harvest has truly been a community effort. Thanks to everyone who’s had a hand in growing this summer!

July 2017 Newsletter

jeanne_liston_fall3_2016Lately, the line at our food bank is a bit shorter. Despite appearances, the hush over our headquarters means something might be working.  

The idea behind our new programs is to move our neighbors out of our food bank lines and into growing spaces where they can harvest food by their own hands to share with their families. There are already signs this change is in motion.

The Bloom Truck and Lunch in the Park have served nearly as many children as we planned to feed by the end of the summerBloom Youth are now leading tours of the farm they were first setting foot on two months ago. At the same time, our Volunteer for Veggies program is redefining access, with over 80 volunteers to date! 

Throughout the community, our summer programs are making food more accessible, more affordable, and more fun.

All of this, because of you. You moved the dial. You refused to stand idly by. You supported change and together, we’ve made a difference. Thank you for your remarkable commitment.

With your continued support, we can grow this momentum. Our summer fundraiser is in full swing and your investment will go twice as far with a generous matching gift of $25,000!

Please consider making a gift to feed more families. 

Read the July 2017 Newsletter. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, executive director


FROM THE FIELD

Bloom Community Farm, in peak season, is something to behold. Not only is it alive with broccoli, carrots, zucchini, peppers, peas, beets, and greens, it’s alive with an array of community members tending the grounds. People of all ages, experiences, backgrounds, and neighborhoods work side by side, shovel by shovel, making our community a better place for all people. 

The following programs from the field have been wildly popular and impactful. Click here to give to continue to grow these programs.

BLOOM YOUTH PROJECT

Bloom Youth Project interns’ Mobile Market is officially open for business! The interns, who have been managing food production at Bloom Community Farmturned their harvest into a business for social good.

The Mobile Market sells deeply discounted Bloom produce in vulnerable neighborhoods each week. In the process, the interns have learned hands on skills they can use in the future, all the while giving back to our community.  

Megan Schooley, garden & youth education supervisor, said, The interns exude pride in their work. They’re proud to share the stories behind the produce they’re selling, how they grew and harvested the food themselves, and share in the excitement of fresh, affordable fruits and veggies with their customers.” 

Bloom Youth Project is a paid internship for local teens with promise that empowers interns to manage food production at Bloom Community Farm and share what they harvest with their neighbors in need. 

VOLUNTEER FOR VEGGIES

Volunteer for Veggies provides access to fresh, healthy food for everyone in the community. 

Volunteers take home a share of the farm freshest, nutrient richest, most delicious fruits and veggies around in exchange for their time at Bloom Community Farm or The Hope Garden.

Time on the farm is spent seeding, weeding, and harvesting our growing spaces and we reward all volunteers with a share of produce fresh out of the ground.

In its first month, over 80 people have volunteered at the farm!

Interested in learning more? Click here for current volunteer hours

CELEBRATE THE FARM WITH US!

Join us for a growing season open house at Bloom Community farm. We’ll celebrate with with tours, good company, and light refreshments. Hope to see you there!

June 2017 Newsletter

jeanne_liston_fall3_2016This summer, we’re getting familiar with uncharted territory.

Now that our maps are drawn and our compasses calibrated, we’re launching new programs that defy convention. These programs, while modeled after successful solutions across the country, are unique to Blaine County. 

You’ve been with us as we dare to dream, pioneer solutions, and pilot programs to best address hunger in our community. Everything you have done to help has propelled the solution forward and we’re thrilled to share in the adventure with you. 

This summer, keep an eye out for Bloom Truck, keep an ear out for updates on Bloom Youth interns, and keep stopping by the farm or garden to lend a hand and help a neighbor. Your interest and support make a difference. 

Already, our neighbors are volunteering for veggies with their families. They are filling their plates with fresh, Bloom produce and giving their children a meaningful experience.

And it’s only just begun. 

Your support keeps these innovative new programs in orbit. Please consider making a gift to ensure these programs fulfill our goals and acutely address hunger in Blaine County. 

Read the full June newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, executive director


FROM THE FIELD

The latest field reports from Bloom Community Farm and The Hope Garden are etched in red, white, and green. Radishes, onions, lettuce, asparagus, and spinach already fill the shelves of our food bank while two of our most exciting programs to date, Volunteer for Veggies and Bloom Youth Project, are making a lasting difference in Blaine County.

VOLUNTEER FOR VEGGIES

Volunteer for Veggies provides access to fresh, healthy food for everyone in the community. 

Volunteers take home a share of the farm freshest, nutrient richest, most delicious fruits and veggies around in exchange for their time at Bloom Community Farm or The Hope Garden.

Time on the farm is spent seeding, weeding, and harvesting our growing spaces and we reward all volunteers handsomely with a share of produce fresh out of the ground. The exchange of volunteer service for fresh produce provides hope and empowerment for volunteers.

Interested in learning more? Click here for current volunteer hours

BLOOM YOUTH PROJECT


Click to watch Bloom Youth raise the roof on our greenhouse!

The Bloom Youth interns are in step. As their confidence grows and their talents shine, they’re proudly taking ownership of their work. In just over a month, the students have weeded, planted, harvested, made and met some personal and financial goals, topped off a commercial sized greenhouse, and drafted a business plan for the Bloom Mobile Market, which will deliver fresh, affordable produce throughout the community. 

One of the Bloom Youth said her favorite part of the program is, “learning new things that will help me in life, because knowledge is a good trait.” Another intern shared that since the program started, cooking is one of my biggest passions. With support, compassion, and guidance, the sky’s the limit for these remarkable young people.

Bloom Youth Project is a paid internship for local teens with promise that empowers interns to manage food production at Bloom Community Farm and share what they harvest with their neighbors in need.

May 2017 Newsletter

jeanne_liston_fall3_2016The spring thaw signals wildflowers and big rivers. While May often stirs anticipation for summer adventures, it’s still one of the most challenging months for our neighbors in need. In painful contrast to the new growth of the season, May is one of seasonal unemployment and less funding for our food programs. 

You can imagine, it’s impossible to enjoy the best of May when you’re struggling to pay rent, fuel your car, and eat a decent meal. Fortunately, you have two exciting opportunities to make a difference this month. Idaho Gives is coming around the bend to help offset the grim cost of slack. Join us tomorrow, May 4 to support those struggling through the season by making a gift during Idaho Gives. To sweeten the pot, the very generous Nalen Foundation has put up a matching gift of $5,000 to double your impact that day! You can also join us for a scratch-made brunch at The Haven on May 25th to learn more about our work and raise funds to feed those in need.

Read the full May newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

With your generosity, we will help local families make it through this bleak time and ring in summer, a time of abundance and exciting new programs from The Hunger Coalition. 

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, executive director


IDAHO GIVES

Idaho Gives is a statewide day of giving. It’s an opportunity to unite our community around causes in which we truly believe and help nonprofit organizations connect to the larger community.

Last week was our biggest week of 2017. The Hunger Coalition fed more families than in any week this year. You can help us ensure we don’t have to turn any child or family away.

With a matching gift of up to $5,000 from the Nalen Foundation, your gifts during Idaho Gives will go twice as far and feed twice as many! 

You can help make our campaign a success! Here are some easy ways:

Share and share alike. Online days of giving are successful because of our own networks. Help us grow our network by sending this email to your network and ask your friends to do the same.

Be socially (media) active. Use your social media networks: post on Facebook, tweet about Idaho Gives, and share your love for your particular passion. Ask others to do the same.

Thank you in advance for your support!


FROM THE FIELD 

The Bloom Youth Project interns are immersed in growth. This transformative internship empowers paid interns to manage food production at Bloom Community Farm and build a business plan for our Bloom Mobile Market, selling discounted, fresh produce to low-income neighborhoods. These teens with promise will feed the hungry while learning critical job and life skills that may help keep them out of our food bank lines as adults.

Already, the interns have weeded, laid irrigation at the farm, and participated in several life-skills workshops. This dynamic, hardworking group is ready to make a big difference this year. 

Heartfelt thanks to the Wood River Women’s Foundation for generously investing in the futures of these teens with a gift of $25,000. Stay tuned to learn what and how the Bloom Youth grow!

April Newsletter

jeanne_liston_fall3_2016There’s some truth to time is money. Collectively, our mighty team of volunteers invest nearly $200,000 worth of their time per year. But volunteers provide something more powerful than savings. The amount of heart our volunteers invest in The Hunger Coalition is immeasurable. 

You can’t calculate how many of our neighbors’ worst days have been eased by the kindness of a volunteer. There’s no way to quantify the taste of a good meal after days on an empty stomach shared by someone who cares. A formula won’t tell you the value of a smile, a laugh, or an open heart, but we can. We’ve seen firsthand the remarkable impact volunteers have on those struggling in our community. 

These moments are what make volunteers some of the most admirable, selfless, extraordinary people in Blaine County. We are grateful every day of the year, but for Volunteer Appreciation Month, we want to take a special moment to share our gratitude with you.

In the midst of hunger season, a time when donations subside along with employment, we are especially grateful for the commitment of our volunteers who help better the lives of our neighbors in need.

Thank you to everyone who has served and continues to serve at The Hunger Coalition to make our community a better place for all people.

Read the full April newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

Happy Volunteer Appreciation Month!

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, executive director


VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT: KATIE ROUSEY

The Hunger Coalition wouldn’t be what it is today without the support of volunteer, Katie Rousey (pictured right). Katie has been volunteering for over five years, and has helped make our food distribution a warm and welcoming place. She cultivates invaluable relationships with our neighbors in need and is simply a delight to be around.

Katie writes, “Volunteering is the highlight of my week. It’s a very good feeling to be helping with such an endeavor, and I’m proud to be a part of the team!”

The feeling is mutual. Rachel Shinn, volunteer manager for The Hunger Coalition, said, “In the five years Katie’s been volunteering, she’s certainly become a part of the family. Each week, she shows up to help distribute food to families and individuals in our community.  Our clients have come to rely on her reassuring smile, dynamic sense of humor, and a friendly conversation about produce, pets, kids or just life in general. She’s such an important member of the community and we’re so grateful she shares her time with The Hunger Coalition!

Thank you, Katie! We are truly grateful to have you on the team.


FROM THE FIELD 

What makes The Hope Garden and Bloom Community Farm grow? Our productive annual harvest is largely thanks to the toil and talent of our volunteers, including the wonderful, Barbara Kuhn. Barbara started as a volunteer, bringing Daily Bites to local students. As an avid gardener, she eventually found a fit at Bloom Community Farm.

At the Farm, Barbara helped maintain perennial plantings, which are important for feeding bees and keeping plants pollinated. Not to mention, she weeded a ton and helped mulch a row of carrots, which is no easy feat. Lynea Petty, food production manager said, “I appreciated Barbara’s hard work and her passion for getting stuff done for our community!”

Thank you, Barbara for your commitment to giving back and growing food security for our neighbors.

March 2017 Newsletter

jeanne_liston_fall3_2016Big challenges can be overcome by small acts of kindness

Whether it’s the low to no wages of slack, the high cost of winter, or an unexpected crisis, hunger is a challenge twelve months a year.

One of the most powerful and efficient ways you can help local families in urgent need is with a monthly gift. Take it from non-profit strategy consultant, Zana Davey, monthly giving programs are convenient and rewarding. Your small, enduring acts of kindness can move mountains.

To up the ante, local supporters Michael & Esther Ochsman will make your gift even more powerful with a match of up to $5,000 for anyone joining or increasing their monthly support through our Open Hands ClubNow you can give twice as much, every month!

Little by little, month by month, every drop in the bucket will eventually fill the well. We hope you will consider joining our monthly giving club to help local families, every month, every season of the year.

Read the full March newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, executive director


DONOR SPOTLIGHT: ZANA DAVEY

Introducing, Zana Davey, non-profit strategy consultant, former Hunger Coalition Board youth representative, and our youngest Open Hands Club member. In high school, Zana joined The Hunger Coalition board to share her fresh perspective and advance the well-being of her neighbors. Less than a decade later, she’s made a life of social good, empowering non-profits to be all they can be.

Gratitude inspires Zana’s giving. She said, “I’m just so grateful for all of the opportunities I’ve been afforded in my own life, giving back is how I express my gratitude.” She joined The Hunger Coalition’s Open Hands Club to help provide  sustainable support for her hometown and “because an automated, monthly donation makes it so easy and takes all the work out of giving.Thank you, Zana for all you do to make our world a better place!


FROM THE CLASSROOM

COOKING MATTERS® FOR ELDERS 

Congratulations to the graduates of our recent Cooking Matters® for Elders course, in partnership with The Idaho Foodbank. For many students, graduation was just a stepping stone to continuing education. The group learned so much and had such a great time, they organized subsequent feasts to continue putting their new skills to good use and sharing what they learn with friends and family.

A daughter of one of the students said, “My mom and her friend took this class and they absolutely loved it! My family got to reap the benefits, as my mom made us one of the recipes over the weekend and it was delicious!”

Thank you students, volunteers, St. Luke’s Wood River Nutritionist, Sarah Seppa, Esta of Esta at Club 511The Idaho FoodbankSt. Luke’s Wood River Foundation, Valley of Peace Lutheran Church, Pastor Jerry Reinke and The Hunger Coalition‘s Sharon Dohse who made it all possible.

FINANCIAL LITERACY WORKSHOPS

Our first series of Financial Literacy workshops was one fiscally responsible party after another. Led by Gus O’Neill, client resource & outreach coordinator, the series helped students learn to better navigate their finances and maximize their budget

Gus said, “Wow, these ladies rock! Their motivation to work toward financial independence brought me joy teaching the class. I hope future students demonstrate such a commitment to learning and personal growth.”

February 2017 Newsletter


jeanne_liston_fall3_2016Big goals are our North Star.
 
Goals help turn our wildest dreams into action to ensure we have a lasting impact on our community.

Your generosity gives life to big goals. 

This time last year, Bloom was a wild dream. With heart, grit, long hours, and your support, we harvested nearly 1,000 lbs of food from Bloom Community Farm and served 144 children lunch from the Bloom Trailer, all through a program that was just a question mark on our chalkboard less than a year ago.

You made this possible.

Setting goals for 2017 fed the fire in our hearts. Building on the momentum from last year, we are poised to help more people than ever, in brand new ways. If the response from our Empty Bowls event or Naomi Spence’s Women’s March speech is any indication, 2017 is going to be productive. Thank you to everyone who has already rallied for food security.

We’re excited to share our goals with you so we can continue on this path together, helping local families and improving our community.

Join us to make sure no one in Blaine County goes hungry

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, Executive Director

Read the full February newsletter here. Or, better yet, have it sent automatically to your in-box every month.


AMBITION TO FRUITION 

Presenting The Hunger Coalition’s 2017 goals: 

1. To continue to answer the need by providing food assistance for 17% of Blaine County or 3,500 people.

2. Engage community members to provide 8,000 volunteer hours, keeping our organization efficient.

3. Work with partner advocates involved in our Snack Pack Program to provide 6,250 snack packs to 200 students.

4. Increase healthy summer meals served to a total of 275 children through our expanded Summer Food Program: Bloom, Lunch in the Park, and Summer Camps

5. Ensure 100% of mothers who reach out to us have access to vital nutrition for their infants during the first year of their lives through our Infant Formula Program.

6. Provide two opportunities per week at Bloom Community Farm and The Hope Garden for Volunteer for Veggies during the growing season.

7. Run an 18-week Mobile Market for low income seniors and other vulnerable populations, offering food and nutrition education for a minimum of 25 people weekly.

8. Provide a platform for 10 partner groups at Bloom Community Farm and three groups at The Hope Garden to achieve mutual community wellness goals.

9. Engage up to 75 youth and adults in comprehensive Nutrition Education that will improve long-term health through nutritious, affordable eating.

10. Rescue a minimum of 85,000 pounds of food through our Food Rescue Program to feed the hungry, reduce food waste, and maximize community resources.


RAISING THE BAR

The conversation around living wage is one that often gets lost in variables. Since Naomi Spence’s stirring speech at the Women’s March in Ketchum, we’ve been asked what exactly constitutes a livable wage in Blaine County? To help bring clarity to the conversation, Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT) developed a resource that calculates living wage across the country. The calculator lists typical expenses, the living wage, and poverty wages for the selected location. Click here to calculate the living wage for Blaine County.

Over 3,500 people in our community rely on food assistance, most of whom work, but make less than the livable wage in Blaine County. While we are committed to providing food for these families, another part of our mission is to address the underlying causes of hunger. We move to open the dialogue around the local living wage so together, we can better solve the problems that plague our neighbors.

Contact Naomi at 788-0121 or nspence@thehungercoalition.org to join the conversation.

January 2017 Newsletter

Looking back on 2016, we marvel at the depth and strength of your compassion. It’s a humbling reminder of the power of collective good.Because of your support, we are making a seismic shift in how we resolve food insecurity this year.

A movement is afoot. Bloom Community Farmand the Bloom Trailer will redefine how we perceive hunger, how we address hunger, and how our neighbors rise out of hunger. Your continued support is paramount to the success of this movement. Your time, your ideas, your passion, your gifts will help feed more families in revolutionary new ways.

Just look at the remarkable numbers written by your generosity in 2016 and imagine what more is possible in the coming year.

  • The Mobile Food Bank distributed 6,063  healthy food boxes to 1,533 community members who are struggling.
  • Over 6,250 Snack Packs were given out to almost 210 school kids, to ensure they don’t go hungry on the weekends.
  • More than 4,300 lunches and snacks were distributed this summer though our Summer Food Program.
  •  2,835 bottles worth of formula were distributed through our Infant Formula Initiative.
  • Families were able to keep their pets thanks to the “Paws for Hunger” program, in association with the Animal Shelter of the Wood River Valley. This year, a record 1,139 bags of pet food were distributed.
  • Over 7,500 pounds of fruit and vegetables were gleaned from local trees last year!

We enter hunger season hopeful that with our collective efforts, we can bring light to our neighbors’ darkest days and move forward together, in health and happiness.

With Gratitude,

Jeanne Liston, Executive Director

Read the full January newsletter here. Or, better yet, get it automatically in your in-box every month. We won’t spam you with tons of emails.. just one a month, for you to keep up on what’s shaking at THC!


JOIN US FOR EMPTY BOWLS

We hope to see you at the 7th annual Empty Bowls event to enjoy great food and great art on behalf ofThe Hunger Coalition. Purchase a handmade ceramic bowl for $20 and fill it with soup, chili, salad, bread, and dessert made by local chefs! All proceeds benefit The Hunger Coalition.

This signature Wood River event is made possible by the collaboration of Boulder Mountain Clayworks,Presbyterian Church of the Big Wood, and The Hunger Coalition. If you can’t attend, you can donate $20 here to support those in need and write Empty Bowls in the notes section.


WHAT A YEAR!

Without the thousands of volunteer hours and generous donations from the community, plates would be empty, children would go to bed hungry, and life in Blaine County would be impossible for our neighbors in need.

To all of our donors, volunteers, and community members who spark the magic in our mission, we are thrilled to share our end of the year thank you video with you.

Special thanks to Dark to Light Productions for the video production toolkit, education, and encouragement.